Wax moths – an unlikely environmental hero.

 

Wax moths have been one of my biggest challenges as a beekeeper, they’ve caught me out a fair few times. In my first season I listened to some advice that moths weren’t attracted to honey supers because they didn’t have the scent of broad in. That cost me stack of supers. Last year I extracted some honey and left two supers indoors, within two weeks the dreaded moths had made them their home. To be fair leaving empty supers in the kitchen was what my wife would call ‘lazy’

Suffice to say given my defeats at its hands .. erm … feet; I’m not a fan.

However; now researchers have discovered that Wax Worms, the larvae of the Wax Moth, are capable of eating and digesting Polyethylene. Since the end of the Second World War Polyethylene (PE) has been used in everything from bubble wrap to bullet proof vests. Cheap to produce, flexible and adaptable PE is one of those ubiquitous substances of modern day life. Unfortunately it is also one of the World’s most polluting substances.

Plastic pollution is a real environmental challenge. When you consider that we produce over a trillion plastic bags a year and despite PE being highly recyclable only about 5% of the plastic bottles produced are made from recycled material you can get a sense of the scale of the issue. PE also takes decades to begin to biodegrade. This discovery may eventually lend to processes that can break PE down into a more manageable by-product.

So although I will continue to wage war of the wax moth, they’ll have my grudging respect as one day they may provide solutions to a problem way bigger than my lost frames.

The Beehive Jive Podcast 004 – Alexa: how do I start beekeeping?

In this episode Tracey and Paul talk about things to consider if you want to jump into the exciting World of beekeeping.

In summary:

• Join a local club
• Take a class
• Make friends

It really is that simple ….. almost

00:00: What’s going on in Tracey’s apiary?
03:00: What’s up with Paul’s bees.
15:00: How to start beekeeping
16:50: Where to start
18:30: Find a local club
25:00: Types of hive
29:00: Where to get bees from
44:00: What can you do in the winter?
46:00: Book recommendations
52:00: Online resources

Links to stuff mentioned in this podcast.

British Beekeepers Association – https://www.bbka.org.uk/
Beebase – http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/
Guide to Bees & Honey: The World’s Best Selling Guide to Beekeeping- http://amzn.eu/1v0QLZ0
Bees at the Bottom of the Garden – http://amzn.eu/gCisynG
The Bee Manual: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Keeping Bees – http://amzn.eu/3dZsCDe
The Honey Bee Around and About – http://amzn.eu/0qM7itM

Spring check: how safe is your apiary?!

Whether your apiary is at home or away, it’s important to consider whether it is safe and convenient for you.  I’m not talking about ‘health and safety gone mad’, just common sense!

Fly poster by subdude

An apiary should work for the beekeeper as well as the bees. And as I’ve discovered recently, there are a number of danger zones in my apiary that need attention.  Spring is the time to asses your apiary and rectify anything that doesn’t work for you.

Take a look at the following: a taut wire (in the foreground), a fence post from a fallen-down fence, a thicket of brambles and nettles, and some broken breeze blocks thrown in for good measure:

What could possibly go wrong?

Well, it did go wrong the other day and certain parts of my anatomy are still tingling from the thorns and nettle stings! I’m lucky that it wasn’t worse.  I could have knocked myself out or disembowelled myself with my hive tool.

Luckily no-one was there to witness my humiliation but the most embarrassing thing about it is that I’ve tripped there before and I did nothing to remedy it.

There are other things that keep happening: hitting my heat on overhanging tree branches, not having enough space to work certain colonies and mossy logs lying camouflaged on the ground which I always take great care to step over . . . that is, until I’m carrying equipment and can’t see them.

This makes me sound like a sloppy beekeeper but I definitely am not that. I just get so wrapped up in what’s best for the bees (and the public) that I de-prioritise my own convenience.

It is completely about applying common sense.

Allow me to share some tips from my own experience. Hopefully I have made these mistakes so that you don’t have to!

First, take time to cut back those brambles and anything else that can trip you or catch hold of you. Trim back branches so they don’t hit you on the head or slap you in the face! Ducking and dodging is risky and inconvenient.

Arrange your apiary so that you have adequate space to inspect hives in comfort, including putting roofs on the ground, lifting and stacking supers and generally moving around. If you’re in a small space that is uncomfortable it risks the chance of falling over or of being clumsy and disturbing the bees. If you can’t move a hive consider changing the frames from warm way to cold way or vice versa.

When it comes to equipment, remember that your hive tool is like a weapon – it’s strong, sharp and would get you arrested if you carried it in certain situations!   Learn to use it properly and be careful when it’s in the pocket of your bee suit.

You’ll think I’m really pointing out the obvious now, but smokers can and do set fire to things – like dry grass at your apiary or the back of your car! Suddenly your car is full of smoke and other drivers are frantically gesticulating at you.  Yes, I know that this need to spell things out probably explains a lot about my own mishaps, but it did really happen to me and others I know!

Lie smokers on their side and plug the spout with a knot of green grass or a cork.  Check that they are cool and fully extinguished. If you’re not careful the lid can slip open when you’re driving along, letting in oxygen which re-ignites the fire. Some beekeepers put them in a tin which seems like a good idea, I just have to find a tin that’s big enough.

On a more serious note, something happened that really scared me one evening: I was hassled by two people who wouldn’t go away. My apiary is tucked away and not visible. My phone was in my car and I couldn’t get to it. I thought that if they came any closer I would push over a beehive.

Luckily it didn’t come to that but now I do keep my mobile on me and fully charged and I tell someone where I’m going.  I think that’s especially important for us girls.  And I do keep Piriton in the car in case I react to a sting (which has never happened, touchwood, but I have beekeeping friends who this has happened to).

To me, beekeeping is beautiful thing and anything that niggles me in my apiary is an unwanted distraction from quality time with my bees.

The moral of these sad stories?:   a happy beekeeper helps to keep bees happy too!

The Beehive Jive Podcast 003 – Spring into Spring

The Beehive Jive Podcast Episode 003: Spring into Spring

In this episode Tracey and Paul discuss what they do to give their bees the best start in the spring.

Notes: We recorded this in a garden room, so we had a good view but the audio quality is occasionally a little wonky – lessonlearnt. On the plus side, you can hear the birds singing away in the background.
When discussing Asian hornets Paul said they had a red thorax … oops …. they have a red abdomen:
http://www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/index.cfm?id=4

http://www.thebeehivejive.com/3

twitter @thebeehivejive
email : thebeehivejive@gmail.com
Beekeeping blog: http://thebehivejive.com

Beekeepers’ Corner youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAWbLe43GXsRx45OYWJhqWw

00:00 – 10:00 : Asian Hornet UK update
Asian Hornet update – in the last show we spoke about the Asian Hornet and we were unsure if the nest found in the UK had come from the population in the EU or arrived via another route – it has now been confirmed that it has come from the European population.

For more information about this threat check out the FERA page – http://fera.co.uk/news/showNews.cfm?id=795

17 March 2017 update:

Scottish Goverment today confirmed that a single Asian Hornet, Vespa velutina had been identified at a retail warehouse in the central belt of Scotland. The Asian Hornet is a non-native species and a serious predator of honey bees and other pollinators which has recently become established in Europe. There are no more public health risks associated with Asian hornets than with other bees or wasps.

Asian hornets were first identified in the UK during autumn 2016, that outbreak was dealt with and no further reports have been confirmed since. It is not possible to identify the origin of this individual and no further sightings have been made, however for surveillance purposes SG has placed Asian Hornet traps in the area and alerted the pest control industry and beekeepers to be vigilant for this species

10:00 – 21:00 : Tracey’s first inspection of the year.
22:00 – 28:00 : Bait hives. Check out the bucket bait hive featured on Kiwi Mana Buzz – http://kiwimana.co.nz/swarm-trapping-bees-with-a-mobile-swarm-trap-km104/
28:00 – 30:00 : Varroa control with sugar.
30:00 – 32:00 : Do you change boxes every season?
32:00 – 43:00 : Paul’s apiary inspection
43:00 – 53:00 : Hive records on the roof.
53:00 – 60:00 : Nosema & shook swarms
60:00 – 1:10 : Swarm control
1:10 – 1:14 : Clipping Queens
1:14 – 1:00 : Letter bag

Happy Beeday

Ah birthdays, don’t you love them?  I am discovering that I don’t love them as much as I used to!  But I do love it that every year my friends and family take time to find bee-themed cards and presents.

Mind you, I am very easy to please as I adore anything with bees on it.  Everything from postcards to coffee mugs, fridge magnets and honey itself.

This year’s birthday cards were especially lovely so I just had to share my favourites.

First, this is very special to me as it’s from friends Noah and Maeve who live in Sydney and they made it themselves.  I love the stripey bee nest! Shouldn’t every fashion-conscious bee have a matching hive?!

The bees seem to be flying in loops out of sheer delight!  There are even real flowers pasted to the card:

Noah and Maeve have a colony of Australian native stingless bees in their garden.  I couldn’t resist including a photo of them in this ‘Beeday’ blog because they are very different to our UK bees and equally as fascinating.  These amazing tiny creatures produce comb in the shape of a rose:

Isn’t that beautiful?

Another favourite birthday card came from friends Peter and Jane.  This card is just so positive and uplifting. Every day that has bees in it is a good day for me!  (Except when they’re outwitting me with their cunning plans!)

Here’s to drawing the blinds to many sunny days this year:

Happy Beedays to all of us . . . .

Tracey

 

 

 

 

Episode 002 – Oops we did it again.

Hello,

Welcome to episode two of the Beehive Jive beekeeping podcast.
We’re two beekeepers based in South London, we don’t claim to be experts so this isn’t the place for you if you’re looking for beekeeping gurus.

However; if you enjoy hearing people chatting about bees this is the podcast for you.
In this episode, we discuss some of the pests threaten out bees and what precautions we can take to support our hives and other beekeepers.

Find us at our beekeeping blog http://www.thebeehivejive.com
Or follow us on twitter @thebeehivejive

Show notes

00:00 – 16:00: Varroa is Australia
16:00 – 25:00:  shook swarm
25:30 – 28:30: Small hive beetle in Italy
28:30 – 39:00: Asian hornet
39:00 – 43:00: Bees alarm signal
43:00 – 60:00: What we’ll be doing in our apiary in the next few weeks

Links to things we talked about:

Foudationless frames http://theapiarist.org/blog/
Register your bees – http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/

Whoop whoop – http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04sxddd
Asian hornet traps – http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?pageid=208
Shook swarms – www.nationalbeeunit.com/downloadDocument.cfm?id=1075

Make these simple robbing screens now and get ahead for summer

I am hopeless at getting equipment cleaned and prepared over winter BUT this year I promised myself it would be different!  No more panics or searching for substitutes!  Now that the bees are flying more often and bringing in pollen, it’s time to get my act together . . .

Robbing screens are a very good thing to have ready at the end of summer so why not get ahead and make them now?  I talked about them in our first podcast.  I used them last year when a very aggressive episode of robbing started at my apiary.  It was very stressful and alarming, and that was just for the beekeeper, never mind the poor bees!  Full supers of honey disappeared, some colonies were badly weakened and members of the public upset.  Not an experience I want to repeat.

Robbing screens helped to restore some order in this chaos.  There are various designs out there but some of the more sophisticated seem to involve carpentry skills that I unfortunately don’t have.  A simple but effective design is an easier and cheaper option for me.

Design for a basic robbing screen

This is the design that I use:

How does it work?

Its very simple:  the screen is pinned over the hive entrance, long ways.  The bees that live in the colony will enter through the V-shaped gaps at the sides.  The robbers, who are chancers that zig-zag in front of the hive entrance, will be confused and won’t work out how to get in.

With the screen in place, you don’t have to reduce the hive entrance which is much better for ventilation and reducing heat in the colony.

You can use gaffer tape to close off one end of the entrance, leaving the bees with one side entrance that is easier for the colony to defend.

Remember though that this is just one tactic in the war against robbing and it won’t work in isolation:  you still have to follow the usual rules to ensure that your apiary is a harmonious place!  You still need to ensure that you don’t feed during the day, that you feed all colonies at the same time, that you don’t leave syrup or comb lying around and that you don’t open colonies at the end of summer without very good reason . . . ok, lecture over!

How to make a simple robbing screen

I bought the mesh from an independent local hardware store and assume it’s widely available:

It  came in one large sheet, approx 70cm x 70 cm.  It is important that it is thin enough to cut with scissors and fold into shape by hand.  The gauge is small enough to stop bees passing through but large enough for ventilation.

Using kitchen scissors, I cut a piece long enough to cover the hive entrance and wide enough to fold three times.  I tend to eyeball measurements but if I had to guess I would say the dimensions are roughly 25 cm x 15 cm (please measure against your own hives first!!).

Make the folds by turning and pressing the mesh under and over until it forms an approximate ‘W’ shape when you open it up:

Because the mesh is sharp, I line the entrance points (the V points at the sides) with some gaffer tape to protect the bees.  The pen is pointing to the entrance that the bees use:

Here is another version that you can make which is a bit more fiddly but effective nonetheless.  The flat sides are pinned to the hive.  The bees enter through the top:

I hope that’s shown you how easy it is to make a robbing screen.  And to show you a robbing screen in action, click on the link below to take a look at a video of the robbing frenzy in my apiary last September.  The screen immediately stopped the robbers getting in and things settled down despite the severity.  This year I’ll be fitting them earlier to prevent robbing in the first place!!

The trouble with manuka

A manuka flower

 

Manuka honey is unique. It is the only honey I’ve seen with a security tag attached. It’s expensive stuff. Last week in my local supermarket there was a jar for £35, I’ve seen it double that in other places. A hefty price tag for honey that doesn’t even taste that nice. Manuka honey is lucrative and devious people have been flooding the market with fake manuka honey;

This week I was listening to the recent episode of the Kiwi Mana Buzz, if you don’t listen to them you really should. Margret & Gary covered a dispute between a manuka trade association in New Zealand and the Cornwall based Tregothnan estate who sell manuka produced by the bees on their estates from manuka trees planted over one hundred years ago.

However; compared to the problems of fake manuka the debate if Tregothnan should label its honey manuka is a minor dispute.

In 2013 Food Standards Agency reported that shops in the UK sold over 1800 tons of manuka honey. Surprising given that only 1700 tons of it was exported from New Zealand and Australia. The FSA estimated over 10,000 tons were sold Worldwide.

Manuka honey, what?

Manuka honey is produced from the the manuka tree, a native of New Zealand and parts of Australia. Before the 1980s it wasn’t as popular as more delicately flavored honeys. In 1982 Dr. Paul Molan identified the antibacterial properties of manuka honey. Science confirmed the long traditional of honey being used to treat wounds and infections was based on fact.

Science behind them, manuka honey producers successfully marketed their product to the health food industry; attracting a high premium. Manuka isn’t unique in having these properties. Honey from ScotlandWales and other parts of the World all have research replicating the manuka effect. Good honey is simply good for you.

Yes, people even fake honey.

Manuka isn’t the only type of honey to fall victim to honey fraudsters. Honey is one of the World’s most counterfeited food products. In 2011 the Food Safety News published a study showing that three quarters of honey sold in the USA had all it’s pollen filtered out. This is done so the pollen cannot be used to identify where the honey comes from. You could well be eating honey from countries treating their hives with antibiotics or toxic chemicals banned in Europe and the USA. Honey fraudsters also routinely mix honey with corn syrup to increase its volume.

Buy local.

So how do you avoid buying fake honey? Buying from established specialist retailers is a great way reduce the risk. But, I would strongly suggest buying local honey from your local beekeepers. Local honey is surprisingly easy to find. You often find beekeepers selling their honey at food fairs and markets. It is slightly more expensive than the honey you see on supermarket shelves but still a lot cheaper than manuka  – why not buy 100% local honey?

Failing queens, robbing and rogue nucs: Tracey’s beekeeping year 2016

2016 was a rollercoaster for me and my beekeeping, thanks mainly to the unreliable weather, a shortage of queens, and general disorganisation on my part (when will I learn that winter should be used for cleaning equipment, making up frames etc.?!).

Lesson one:  get my act together, plan properly and use winter to prepare equipment for the coming season!

My key goal for the year was to increase the number of colonies to produce more honey for the land owner I work for.

Things didn’t start well as I broke my ankle and by April it was still in plaster and I was on crutches.  Instead of accepting the limitations of this I tried to carry on regardless, on one occasion causing complete mayhem in my apiary by dropping a full brood box.  Luckily no damage was done (except to my nerves), and my beekeeping friends stepped in to help get things back on track by the end of April.

Lesson two:  fellow beekeepers are always ready to lend a hand, so ask for help!

My apiary is colder than other areas in South London so my bees are always a couple of weeks behind.  After a burst of late March sunshine and pollen, the bees were preparing to swarm.  I have my swarm prevention and control process pretty much worked out thanks to years of trial and error.  But last year’s spring had a sting in its tail with weeks of cool, wet, miserable weather meaning that the emerging queens mated poorly (some turning into drone layers all too quickly) and others simply went stale.

While I had some over-wintered nucs, I simply didn’t have enough mated and laying queens banked to replace all the failing/poorly mated queens.  I had fall back on uniting some colonies.  So my goal to expand my apiary wasn’t unfolding as planned!

Lesson three:  rear enough queens to ensure that young, mated and laying queens are always to hand.

In an act of desperation, I decided to buy in some nucs with extensions.  Now I am not saying that there is anything wrong with buying nucs from a reputable source.  And I used a reputable source.  But I failed to factor in that I had been selecting my bees for years and that they were mostly good tempered, productive, prolific colonies that I knew and (mostly!) loved.  Unfortunately, I didn’t know the bees that I brought in and found that they weren’t exactly friendly and seemed to only produce bees.  The new colonies got bigger and bigger but there was no honey to harvest, and their temperament got worse.  In the end a passer-by was stung and I had to remove them.  I should have simply taken my best colony and split it into six as advised by other beekeepers.

Lesson four:  increase stocks by using your own well-tempered bees or bees whose traits are known to you.

All was not lost, I managed to make up some nucs from my best colonies.  But I learned the hard way that I was not going to achieve an increase without an organised queen rearing programme to support it.  One for 2017 – watch this space!

The main flow when it began wasn’t as strong as the previous year because local forage was affected by the long wet spring.  However I did harvest almost as much honey as the previous year so at least that was something.

Varroa populations were high at the end of summer.  I often do shook swarms in spring to help manage varroa but I couldn’t in 2016 as the weather was so rubbish and not ideal for drawing new comb.  In September I treated some colonies with Apiguard and some with MAQS (depending on the nature of the colony – small ones that needed a lot of feeding got MAQS).  In recent years I have been finding that varroa can then build up again going into December.  I treated all colonies with Apibioxil trickle method (in 1:1 syrup) in late December.  In 2017 I’ll use the vaporisation method as it has been found to have higher efficacy.

2016 had one final lesson for me in the form of robbing:  it was unbelievable and on a frenzied scale that I’d not seen before.  I had to put in some serious detective work to find out who the robbing bees were.  Late one night I closed up all my hives and came back to my apiary the next morning to find it full of bees trying to rob the closed hives.  So the robbers must have been someone else’s bees, from another apiary!  I learned how to make robbing screens which helped a lot and everything calmed down, although damage had been done to a few smaller colonies.

Lesson five:  prevent robbing before it happens – fit robbing screens before autumn feeding and carefully following guidelines around feeding e.g. feed all colonies at the same time, feed at night, don’t spill syrup etc.!

In the end I came out of 2016 with 10 strong colonies and four large nucs.  While 2016 didn’t go according to plan, I learned a lot and became much more confident in handling and clipping queens.

And while it wasn’t the easiest of beekeeping years, I still enjoyed those magical moments when you are working with the bees and you think “How amazing are these creatures, and how lucky am I to be working with them.”

I hope your bees are overwintering well and that the season to come will be a good one for us all.

 

Episode 001 – Do bees forage on strawberries?

Welcome to our very first podcast, We’re two beekeepers based in South London, we don’t claim to be experts so this isn’t the place for you if you’re looking for beekeeping gurus. However; if you enjoy hearing people chatting about bees this is the podcast for you.

Show notes

00:00 – 02:00 – Introduction
02:00 – 04:00 – Paul’s 2016 season in review
04:00 – 14:00 – Experience with foundationless frames
14:00 – 19:00 – First try at Queen raising
19:00 – 22:00 – Tracy’s 2016 season in review
22:00 – 27:00 – Trouble with buying in Nucs
27:00 – 34:00 – Robbing & making robbing screens
36:00 – 38:00 – Adventures with entrance blocks
38:00 – 45:00 – Polynuc the beekeeping Swiss Army Knife
45:00 –56:00 – Feeding hives during the winter
56:00 -60:00 – Plans for next year

Links to things we talked about
BBKA http://www.bbka.org.uk/
Tiger Hall Bees – http://www.tigerhallbees.co.uk/
National Bee Unit -http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/
Queen right method of rearing – http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?pageId=278
Lyson mating nucs – http://tomaszlyson.co.uk/polystyrene-beehives/2777-mini-ul-niemalowany-bez-ramek.html