The Beehive Jive Podcast 005 – Drama free swarm control.

Welcome to episode five of the Beehive Jive podcast. A beekeeping podcast from London, England.

In this episode we discuss the tricky issue of swarming: why do bees swarm, can you spot the early signs and what to do if they do swarm.

 

 

 

Running order:

00:00: What is Paul up to in his bees.

00:08: Tracey’s apiary update

00:14: Stress-free swarm control

00:20 Artifical swarm

00:30 How to spot signs of swarm preparation

00:35 Using swarm control for queen rearing

00:38 How many queen cell to leave in the hive

00:44 Top two tips for swarm control

00:47: Don’t panic and knock down all the cells!!

00:49: Clipping queens

00:55: Collecting swarms

01:00 Wrap up

 

Links:

Guide to swarm control http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/downloadDocument.cfm?id=1077

Why swarming doesn’t have to be a drama: Part 1

Yes, it’s that time of year again. If you are anxiously inspecting your colonies, dreading that you might find a queen cell, then you are not alone!

The swarming process can be very confusing and stressful, especially if you are in your early years of beekeeping.  Everything seems to be going so well:  the hive is full of bees and you start visualising those jars of golden honey when suddenly, it seems that you lose all control – and then half your bees!

For me, swarming has been the cause of tears, injuries, marital discord and hangovers!  All beekeepers have their ‘swarm stories’.  And yet, now that I’ve worked it out, I realise how easy the swarming process is to manage.

Swarming is, after all, a natural behaviour that we need to work with, and not try to stop it or suppress it.  Even before you find that first queen cell, there is a lot you can do to control or at least influence your bees’ swarming preparations.

Why all the drama?

As I said, swarming is completely natural.  But that doesn’t lessen the panic you feel when your neighbours are enjoying a perfect Sunday afternoon in their garden and all hell breaks loose.  Or so it seems to them and you.

Seeing a hive swarm is incredible and fascinating.  You really feel the full animal force of the super organism as it divides and reproduces! However if you’re not a beekeeper, you would undoubtedly be more likely to run away than stand in awe.  I understand why people who aren’t wearing bee suits feel a need to flee the scene.

Then of course there is the strange aftermath with swarms hanging around in trees or wherever – imagine if one of those suddenly appeared in your garden with its busy scouts flying to and fro.  (Obviously as beeks, we’d put it in a hive, but if you’re not a beekeeper . . . ?!)

So I think that swarming can indeed cause a lot of drama – but in itself it isn’t something to panic about.  You are not a bad beekeeper if your bees swarm! But the goal is to find a way of managing their natural swarming behaviour to avoid a swarm issuing from the hive in the first place.

It takes time, attention and experience to do this, but it can be done without the drama – I’m living proof!

Can someone name a swarm control method after me please?

My first nuc swarmed when I’d had it for two weeks.  I now know that shouldn’t have happened, but nevertheless I was scarred from the start!

Determined to tackle swarm control, I tried using the Pagden method of artificial swarming in my first two years.  It was like the dummy’s guide to swarm control:  I went through the manipulation but didn’t always understand why.  I don’t think I ever went through the process of moving the parent hive to the other side of the swarm hive.

As I grew more confident, and space became an issue in my garden, I switched to vertical methods such as Demaree and Snelgrove Boards.

But to be honest, none of these really worked for me.  No doubt there were things that I wasn’t doing correctly.  But at the end of the day, I like things that are simple and that work.  I don’t like equipment or methods that you have to fiddle around with all the time.  And my problem with the swarm methods I was using was that they supposedly required a full spare hive for each colony, and lots of lifting and shifting stuff around.

In searching for a new swarm control method I became overwhelmed with all the options and ideas out there.  Every time I opened a beekeeping journal there was something new to me, named after someone!  This added to my anxiety:  was I doing the right thing?  Would my bees suffer from my ignorance??!!

The kindness of beekeepers

Beware:  when you ask for advice about swarming, set aside an hour or so for the answer.  Beekeepers are notorious for conflicting opinions and contradicting themselves!  I think we all know what I mean!  Should you leave two queen cells or one?  Does the first queen to emerge always sting other queen cells?  Is the cell always capped on day seven? Etc.

I once had two beautiful queen cells to choose from in a swarming colony, and asked fellow beekeepers if I could leave both.  Some said yes, some said no.  I left the two cells and the first queen to emerge didn’t sting the other cell as I had been told.  Instead they cast, leaving me with even less bees.  Still, it was ultimately my decision – and I learned a valuable lesson!

Having said that, when you are at the point where you need support or just don’t know what to do with a colony, ask a beekeeper!  I have always found beekeepers to be kind and supportive (as well as driving me nuts!).  Don’t suffer through swarming alone – ask for help.

So, what is the answer to drama-free swarm control?

I eventually arrived at a simple method of swarm control that doesn’t require a whole spare hive, or moving hives around.  I will explain the process in Part 2 of this blog, but for now, the clue is ‘polynuc’!

In the meantime, I hope you’ve enjoyed this ‘swarm therapy’ session.  I certainly feel better to have got some of these things off my chest.  Just don’t ask me about the time I tried to collect a swarm in my dressing gown!

 

Wax moths – an unlikely environmental hero.

 

Wax moths have been one of my biggest challenges as a beekeeper, they’ve caught me out a fair few times. In my first season I listened to some advice that moths weren’t attracted to honey supers because they didn’t have the scent of broad in. That cost me stack of supers. Last year I extracted some honey and left two supers indoors, within two weeks the dreaded moths had made them their home. To be fair leaving empty supers in the kitchen was what my wife would call ‘lazy’

Suffice to say given my defeats at its hands .. erm … feet; I’m not a fan.

However; now researchers have discovered that Wax Worms, the larvae of the Wax Moth, are capable of eating and digesting Polyethylene. Since the end of the Second World War Polyethylene (PE) has been used in everything from bubble wrap to bullet proof vests. Cheap to produce, flexible and adaptable PE is one of those ubiquitous substances of modern day life. Unfortunately it is also one of the World’s most polluting substances.

Plastic pollution is a real environmental challenge. When you consider that we produce over a trillion plastic bags a year and despite PE being highly recyclable only about 5% of the plastic bottles produced are made from recycled material you can get a sense of the scale of the issue. PE also takes decades to begin to biodegrade. This discovery may eventually lend to processes that can break PE down into a more manageable by-product.

So although I will continue to wage war of the wax moth, they’ll have my grudging respect as one day they may provide solutions to a problem way bigger than my lost frames.

The Beehive Jive Podcast 004 – Alexa: how do I start beekeeping?

In this episode Tracey and Paul talk about things to consider if you want to jump into the exciting World of beekeeping.

In summary:

• Join a local club
• Take a class
• Make friends

It really is that simple ….. almost

00:00: What’s going on in Tracey’s apiary?
03:00: What’s up with Paul’s bees.
15:00: How to start beekeeping
16:50: Where to start
18:30: Find a local club
25:00: Types of hive
29:00: Where to get bees from
44:00: What can you do in the winter?
46:00: Book recommendations
52:00: Online resources

Links to stuff mentioned in this podcast.

British Beekeepers Association – https://www.bbka.org.uk/
Beebase – http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/
Guide to Bees & Honey: The World’s Best Selling Guide to Beekeeping- http://amzn.eu/1v0QLZ0
Bees at the Bottom of the Garden – http://amzn.eu/gCisynG
The Bee Manual: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Keeping Bees – http://amzn.eu/3dZsCDe
The Honey Bee Around and About – http://amzn.eu/0qM7itM

Spring check: how safe is your apiary?!

Whether your apiary is at home or away, it’s important to consider whether it is safe and convenient for you.  I’m not talking about ‘health and safety gone mad’, just common sense!

Fly poster by subdude

An apiary should work for the beekeeper as well as the bees. And as I’ve discovered recently, there are a number of danger zones in my apiary that need attention.  Spring is the time to asses your apiary and rectify anything that doesn’t work for you.

Take a look at the following: a taut wire (in the foreground), a fence post from a fallen-down fence, a thicket of brambles and nettles, and some broken breeze blocks thrown in for good measure:

What could possibly go wrong?

Well, it did go wrong the other day and certain parts of my anatomy are still tingling from the thorns and nettle stings! I’m lucky that it wasn’t worse.  I could have knocked myself out or disembowelled myself with my hive tool.

Luckily no-one was there to witness my humiliation but the most embarrassing thing about it is that I’ve tripped there before and I did nothing to remedy it.

There are other things that keep happening: hitting my heat on overhanging tree branches, not having enough space to work certain colonies and mossy logs lying camouflaged on the ground which I always take great care to step over . . . that is, until I’m carrying equipment and can’t see them.

This makes me sound like a sloppy beekeeper but I definitely am not that. I just get so wrapped up in what’s best for the bees (and the public) that I de-prioritise my own convenience.

It is completely about applying common sense.

Allow me to share some tips from my own experience. Hopefully I have made these mistakes so that you don’t have to!

First, take time to cut back those brambles and anything else that can trip you or catch hold of you. Trim back branches so they don’t hit you on the head or slap you in the face! Ducking and dodging is risky and inconvenient.

Arrange your apiary so that you have adequate space to inspect hives in comfort, including putting roofs on the ground, lifting and stacking supers and generally moving around. If you’re in a small space that is uncomfortable it risks the chance of falling over or of being clumsy and disturbing the bees. If you can’t move a hive consider changing the frames from warm way to cold way or vice versa.

When it comes to equipment, remember that your hive tool is like a weapon – it’s strong, sharp and would get you arrested if you carried it in certain situations!   Learn to use it properly and be careful when it’s in the pocket of your bee suit.

You’ll think I’m really pointing out the obvious now, but smokers can and do set fire to things – like dry grass at your apiary or the back of your car! Suddenly your car is full of smoke and other drivers are frantically gesticulating at you.  Yes, I know that this need to spell things out probably explains a lot about my own mishaps, but it did really happen to me and others I know!

Lie smokers on their side and plug the spout with a knot of green grass or a cork.  Check that they are cool and fully extinguished. If you’re not careful the lid can slip open when you’re driving along, letting in oxygen which re-ignites the fire. Some beekeepers put them in a tin which seems like a good idea, I just have to find a tin that’s big enough.

On a more serious note, something happened that really scared me one evening: I was hassled by two people who wouldn’t go away. My apiary is tucked away and not visible. My phone was in my car and I couldn’t get to it. I thought that if they came any closer I would push over a beehive.

Luckily it didn’t come to that but now I do keep my mobile on me and fully charged and I tell someone where I’m going.  I think that’s especially important for us girls.  And I do keep Piriton in the car in case I react to a sting (which has never happened, touchwood, but I have beekeeping friends who this has happened to).

To me, beekeeping is beautiful thing and anything that niggles me in my apiary is an unwanted distraction from quality time with my bees.

The moral of these sad stories?:   a happy beekeeper helps to keep bees happy too!

Happy Beeday

Ah birthdays, don’t you love them?  I am discovering that I don’t love them as much as I used to!  But I do love it that every year my friends and family take time to find bee-themed cards and presents.

Mind you, I am very easy to please as I adore anything with bees on it.  Everything from postcards to coffee mugs, fridge magnets and honey itself.

This year’s birthday cards were especially lovely so I just had to share my favourites.

First, this is very special to me as it’s from friends Noah and Maeve who live in Sydney and they made it themselves.  I love the stripey bee nest! Shouldn’t every fashion-conscious bee have a matching hive?!

The bees seem to be flying in loops out of sheer delight!  There are even real flowers pasted to the card:

Noah and Maeve have a colony of Australian native stingless bees in their garden.  I couldn’t resist including a photo of them in this ‘Beeday’ blog because they are very different to our UK bees and equally as fascinating.  These amazing tiny creatures produce comb in the shape of a rose:

Isn’t that beautiful?

Another favourite birthday card came from friends Peter and Jane.  This card is just so positive and uplifting. Every day that has bees in it is a good day for me!  (Except when they’re outwitting me with their cunning plans!)

Here’s to drawing the blinds to many sunny days this year:

Happy Beedays to all of us . . . .

Tracey